Fleas, Ticks and Breed-Specific Diseases

Dog Stop Radio Show The June edition of the Dog Stop Radio Show is now available! Our host, Karen Conway, chats with longtime vet tech and G’day Pet Care Pro Emily Marino about fleas and ticks, and also does a fun segment titled “Why Does My Dog DO That?!” in which Marino answers questions from Bark Busters Facebook Fans! Then, learn all about the latest research into breed-specific health conditions from Leann Pape, DMV. To listen, click the links below.

The Truth About Fleas & Ticks

Longtime vet tech and G’day Pet Care Pro Emily Marino tells us all about fleas and ticks—where your dog can get fleas and ticks, how things change depending on seasons of the year and areas of the country, and what you can do to prevent fleas and ticks. She also shares what warning signs to look for and what to do if your dog does get fleas or ticks.

Why Does My Dog DO That?!

G'day Pet CareEver wonder why your dog likes to eat grass, “hump” other dogs or sniff other dogs in, well, less-than-appropriate places? Emily Marino, longtime vet tech and G’day Pet Care Pro, has your answers to these questions and more in this light-hearted edition of the Dog Stop Radio Show.

Advances in Research on Breed-Specific Health Concerns

In this fascinating edition, Dr. Leann Pape of Front Range Animal Hospital in Monument, Colorado, digs into how advances in genetic testing technology are aiding researchers and veterinarians in identifying, diagnosing and treating breed-specific diseases—such as Exercise-Induced Collapse (EIC), an increasingly common condition in Labrador retrievers.

Should You Test Your Dog for Breed-Specific Diseases?

Tune in to listen to Dr. Leann Pape of Front Range Animal Hospital in Monument, Colorado, talk about a variety of breed-specific health conditions and the tests and treatments that are now becoming available. You’ll learn about some of the more common genetic mutations being found, what breeds are commonly affected (and which aren’t), and what to watch for to know if/when you should have your dog tested.

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